Support for carers

A carer is someone who provides unpaid care or support to another person. Many people who care for others don't see themselves as carers; they're mums and dads, husbands, wives, partners, brothers, sisters, friends  and neighbours.

The support that carers give has a huge impact on the lives of those they care for. We value the role of unpaid carers, and understand that caring is part of life for many people.

Carers' assessment

If the person you care for is an adult aged 18 and over (or young person with care and support needs who's about to turn 18) you may be able to get more help to carry on caring and look after your own wellbeing.

If you provide care for another adult and you think you may need support, you're entitled to a carers' assessment. You can have one regardless of whether the person you care for receives help from the council or not.

A carers' assessment is about you and your wellbeing. It will consider the impact that caring is having on your life and what support might be available for you. We decide whether you're eligible for support based on the eligibility criteria set out in national guidelines from the Department of Health. You can find these guidelines at Gov.uk

Young carers

If you're a young person, under the age of 18, and are caring for a relative, you're also entitled to have an assessment.  

Taking a break from caring

Respite care services can provide you with a break from your caring responsibilities for a few hours or a longer period.

It can be provided through support at home, day services, or a respite stay in a residential or nursing home. Our Shared Lives service offers an alternative to home care and care homes for disabled or older people.  Shared Lives is where a family invites an adult with care needs to stay with them in their home and become part of their family. 

Contact us if you want more information about respite care.

Carers' support organisations