JSNA demographics

Barnsley is a diverse and changing place and there are a wide range of factors impacting on the lives of local people and neighbourhoods. These indicators will summarise and track these wider borough characteristics and will help identify the current and future needs of the local population.

The demographics section includes information about:

  • population
  • deprivation
  • protected characteristics
  • armed forces community
  • children in care and care leavers
  • children in need
  • child sexual exploitation
  • disabilities
  • domestic abuse
  • early forced marriage
  • gypsies and travellers
  • lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)
  • people with learning disabilities

Population

Our borough profile

Our borough profile pulls together information, demographics and statistical data taken from a number of sources including the Office for National Statistics, Department for Work and Pensions, Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework, Department for Education and Public Health England, combined into one detailed document for Barnsley.

Where possible the data has been compared to Yorkshire and Humber and England to provide a regional and national comparison of how Barnsley is performing. The report also looks at trends over time, which shows how performance might have improved or where the gap might be closing or widening compared to regional or national rates.

The document contains facts and figures which are helpful in planning, commissioning and designing services.

Why is this important

The Barnsley CCG Population Segmentation Analytics Report 2019 has been developed to represent a place-based, person-centred view of health and care for people registered to a GP Practice, in Barnsley CCG area. This person-centred view, as opposed to solely a service or provider-centred view, is underpinned by a person- centred data model, which spans different care settings. By more deeply understanding health and care needs across the life course, it supports a more targeted focus on improving care for the Barnsley population.



Deprivation

Why this is important

The indices of multiple deprivation, commonly known as the IMD, is the official measure of relative deprivation for small areas in England. The index ranks every small area called lower-layer super output areas (LSOAs) in England (each area represents approximately 650 households or 1,500 people) from 1 (most deprived area) to 32,844 (least deprived area). It focuses on income poverty as well as deprivation more broadly across seven different domains of deprivation. A new 2019 index of multiple deprivation was released on 26 September 2019.

The Barnsley picture and how we compare

Overall Barnsley is ranked the 38th most deprived area in England out of 317 local authorities (where 1 is the most deprived) using the IMD 2019 rank of average score measure. This is a slight increase from IMD 2015 when it was the 39th most deprived area.

Comparative to the other local authorities in South Yorkshire, Barnsley is the second most deprived based on the rank of average score as shown in the table below.

Local authority 2015 2019 Change
Barnsley 39 38 Negative
Doncaster 42 37 Negative
Rotherham 53 44 Negative
Sheffield 56 57 Positive

The seven domains of deprivation are composed of a number of underlying indicators; these are scored and combined to create a domain score for each LSOA.

When Barnsley is ranked relative to the other 316 local authorities using the ‘rank of average score’ by domain (where 1 is the most deprived), the domain in which Barnsley is most deprived is ‘education skills and training’ (15/317). The area in which Barnsley is least deprived is ‘barriers to housing and services’ (311/317).

The main headlines for Barnsley, compared to 2015 are:

  • Overall IMD: Barnsley’s rank of average score has declined slightly from 39 in 2015 to 38 in 2019 (where 1 is the most deprived). The proportion of areas in Barnsley in the most deprived nationally (21.8%) has remained the same as in 2015.
  • Rank of average score:
    • Four domains have seen a decline in their rank of average score (income, crime, barriers to housing and services and income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI))
    • Five domains have seen an improvement in their rank of average score (employment, education, health, living environment and income deprivation affecting older people index (IDAOPI))
  • The percentage of areas in Barnsley in the most deprived nationally:
    • Three domains have seen an increase in the proportion of areas in Barnsley in the most deprived nationally (income, crime and health)
    • Four domains have seen a reduction in the proportion of areas in Barnsley in the most deprived nationally (employment, education, living environment and income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI))
    • The proportion in two domains has remained the same (barriers to housing and services and income deprivation affecting older people index (IDAOPI))

Overall IMD

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 38 39
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 21.8 21.8

Income

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 43 49
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 18.4 17.0

Employment

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 27 18
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 26.5 27.9

Education, skills and training

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 15 10
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 28.6 30.6

Health deprivation and disability

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 22 20
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 34.7 31.3

Crime

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 31 97
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 21.8 7.5

Barriers to housing and services

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 311 321
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 0.7 0.7

Living environment

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 304 264
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 0.0 1.4

Income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI)

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 42 52
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 17.7 19.1

Income deprivation affecting older people index (IDAOPI)

Measure 2019 2015
Rank of average score (where 1 is the most deprived) 79 76
Percentage of areas in the most deprived in England 2.7 2.7

Resources and supporting documents



Protected characteristics

Why this is important

We recognise that all individuals have fundamental human rights and welcome the diversity of the community living, working and learning in the borough. People with protected characteristic should be able to access the same treatments and care as anyone else.

Protected Characteristics are those characteristics protected by the Equality Act 2010, and awareness of these can improve patient care, health outcomes, access to services and experiences of care.

There are nine protected characteristics:

  • age
  • disability
  • gender reassignment
  • marriage and civil partnership
  • Pregnancy and maternity
  • race
  • religion or belief
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

Find out more about equality and diversity.

Find out more about discrimination and your rights.

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Find out more about hate and harassment.

Opportunities for improvement or future development

Information coming soon.

Resources and supporting documentation



Armed forces community

Why this is important

Local authorities and NHS organisations are committed to upholding the Armed Forces Covenant which promises fair treatment for those who serve or have served in the armed forces and their families.  The armed services community includes serving personnel, including reservists and cadets, veterans/ex-forces and their families for all of the services making up the UK's armed forces. 

In general the health of the serving military population is good compared to the general population, thanks to the physical fitness required to join, support networks available and access to health care and employment (Local Government Association, 2017).

However, they're also at a higher risk of musculoskeletal conditions, common mental health disorders and excessive drinking. In the period 1998 to 2017, there were 309 suicides and open verdicts recorded among UK armed forces personnel.  

Outcomes for early service leavers are also thought to be worse, but it is likely that these relate to other factors in their lives prior to their military service.

Although the majority of ex-armed forces personnel can adapt to civilian life without any problems, the veteran population are at increased risk of developing certain physical or mental conditions in later life.  The susceptibility to these risks will vary depending upon their service history as well as other factors such as age and living environment.

As well as the impact military service has on those serving in the armed forces, the impact may also be felt by families, children and young people. For example in terms of house moves, interrupted learning, deployment , increased responsibilities and isolation.

Data from:

Suicide and Open Verdict Deaths in the UK Regular Armed Forces

Supporting Armed Forces children

The Barnsley picture and how we compare

One of the key components of the JSNA is to identify inequalities in health and wellbeing experienced by different population groups in the local authority area.

We're often reliant on research and studies at a national level in order to identify examples of these inequalities.  The findings are then applied to our population structure and added to our own local evidence in order to understand the inequalities present in these populations at a local level.

There are significant problems with estimating the size of the veteran and armed forces community. population as there is no single reliable data source. In October 2017, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported that a census question on service leavers has been developed and will be recommended for inclusion in the 2021 Census; thus enabling, for the first time, the cross tabulation of veterans data with all other characteristics gathered by the 2021 Census and providing access to veterans data at small area level for example wards.

Veterans/ex-services

The ONS 2017 Annual Population Survey (APS) defined veterans as individuals aged 16+ who reside in households in Great Britain and have previously served at least one day in the UK Armed Forces.  

Based on the above definition, the 2017 APS estimated that South Yorkshire is home to 59,000 veterans; this equates to 5% of the county’s 16+ population, which is in line with the national average of 5%.  Data are not available at local authority level, but if the England / South Yorkshire proportion (5%) is applied to Barnsley’s 2017 16+ population, it equates to an estimated 9,900 veterans living in Barnsley.

While the APS does not provide county or local authority level figures relating to the age, gender and ethnicity of veterans, at a national level the APS reported that veterans were estimated to be predominantly white (99%), male (89%) and /or aged 65 and over (60%), noting that the veteran profile was heavily influenced by those who served in the Second World War and subsequent National Service.

Armed forces pension and compensation

Additionally, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) provides annual location of armed forces pension and compensation recipients figures which are widely used as a proxy measure for the number of veterans in each local authority area based on those in receipt of the following:

  • Armed Forces Pension Scheme (AFPS):  A pension scheme available to members of the regular armed forces who have served for a minimum of two years.

  • War Pension Scheme (WPS): A no fault compensation scheme for all members of the regular and reserve force.  It provides compensation for all injuries, ill health and death caused or made worse by service from WW1 in 1914 to 5 April 2005.  Only eligible to claim once left the services.

  • Armed Forces and Reserve Forces Compensation Scheme AFCS, a compensation scheme for all members of the regular and reserve forces.  It provides compensation for all injuries, ill health and death attributable to service where the cause occurred on or after 6 April 2005.

As the WPS and the AFCS are paid to veterans who have been injured whilst serving in the armed forces, it is likely that these claimants have greater health and social care needs.  An individual may be in receipt of an occupational pension and may have also been awarded compensation for service-attributable injury / illness. Therefore individuals may be captured under more than one of the above schemes.

Figure 1 presents the latest armed forces pension and compensation recipient data (as at 31 March 2018) for England, Yorkshire and the Humber and Barnsley.

All recipients

All

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 1,276 64.4
Yorkshire and Humber 32,758 74.2
England 333,013 74.0

Veterans

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 1,203 60.7
Yorkshire and Humber 30,314 68.7
England 307,025 68.3

AFPS recipients

All

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 889 44.8
Yorkshire and Humber 24,840 56.3
England 254,870 56.7

WPS recipients

All

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 493 24.9
Yorkshire and Humber 8,471 19.2
England 85,378 19.0

Veterans

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 455 23.0
Yorkshire and Humber 7,330 16.6
England 72,949 16.2

AFCS recipients

All

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 76 3.8
Yorkshire and Humber 3,309 7.5
England 31,234 6.9

Veterans

Location Number Rate
Barnsley 43 2.2
Yorkshire and Humber 1,986 4.5
England 17,497 3.9

Overall, as at 31 March 2018, there were 1,276 individuals in Barnsley in receipt of one or more armed forces pension or compensation awards.  Of these recipients 1,203 were veterans, equal to a rate of 60.7 veterans per 10,000 population (16+); lower than the regional and national rates of 68.7 and 68.3 veterans per 10,000 population (16+).

Looking at each scheme individually, Barnsley had 889 Armed Forces Pension Scheme (AFPS) claimants, a rate of 44.8 per 10,000 population (16+); again, lower than the regional and national rates of 56.3 and 56.7 per 10,000 population (16+).  Pensions are paid to armed forces personnel upon leaving services, not upon reaching a certain age, so these will not necessarily be older people. 

Barnsley also had 493 War Pensions Scheme (WPS) claimants, 455 of whom were veterans, a rate of 23.0 WPS veterans per 10,000 population (16+); higher than the regional and national rates of 16.6 and 16.2 WPS veterans per 10,000 population (16+).

Finally, Barnsley had 76 Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) claimants, 43 of whom were veterans, a rate of 2.2 AFCS veterans per 10,000 population (16+); lower than the regional and national rates of 4.5 and 3.9 AFCS veterans per 10,000 population (16+).

Data from

Annual population survey UK

Location of armed forces pension and compensation recipients 2018

Armed forces pension and compensation recipients as at 31 March 2018 (Barnsley, Yorkshire and The Humber and England) 

What we're doing and the assets or services we have

A Barnsley Armed Forces Plan is in place to deliver the Armed Forces Covenant. This plan provides information on how we will meet our pledge to acknowledge and understand those who serve or who have served in the armed forces.

GP veteran friendly scheme videos which form part of this accreditation process are posted on the BEST website for all Barnsley GP's to access. 

All practices received communication from NHS England in May 2019 highlighting the vital role GP practices have in supporting improvements being made to healthcare for Armed Forces veterans and their families. Guidance included the importance of utilising the read code ‘Military Veteran’ or ‘Member of Military Family’ both when registering a new patient or existing patients.  This communication was again shared with all Barnsley gp practices via the Practice Managers’ Newsletter.  

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out a commitment to improve care for veterans, with a particular focus on enhancing mental health services for ex-forces.

Opportunities for improvement or future development

The Armed Forces Covenant is a promise by the nation ensuring that those who serve or who have served in the armed forces, and their families, are treated fairly.  This plan provides information on how we will meet our pledge to acknowledge and understand those who serve or who have served in the armed forces.

1. Community and relationships

The armed forces community has healthy relationships and are integrated into our communities

We aim to:

  • To gain greater knowledge and awareness of the forces transition offer to existing armed forces personnel.
  • Lobby Ministry Of Defence re early notification of leavers
  • Ensure stronger linkages between armed forces community groups and area teams
  • Maximise the use of new central Library@ the Lightbox for armed forces information and advice.
  • Suppliers receiving contracts and grants from BMBC are signed up to the covenant
  • To improve BMBC website (as the SPA) for armed forces information – ensure Live Well Barnsley is up to date with armed forces area.  To make links with other key information such as the Career Transition Partnership
  • Review the information pack and consolidate. Ensure the pack is available at key entry points.
  • Gather more stories/videos of the experience of armed forces personnel

2. Employment, education and skills

We want our armed forces community to enter employment successfully.

We aim to:

  • Encourage employers to sign a pledge to support armed forces personnel.  We call it employers promise in Barnsley.
  • Connect to the Career Transition Partnership (CTP)
  • Promote job fairs in partnership with CTP and CTP website
  • Support annual Armed Forces Day
  • Recognise reservists
  • Veterans Walk celebrate armed forces with a dedicated walkway where stones are laid to honour service personnel
  • Offer e-learning for local authorities

3:  Finance and debt

The armed forces community is financially self-supporting and resilient

We aim to:

  • Ensure local advice services ask if people are veterans and are aware of their needs.
  • Promoting advice services on council websites and through the covenant partnerships.

4. Health and wellbeing

We have a greater understanding of the needs  of the armed forces community

We aim to:

  • Audit whether primary care and secondary care and specialist services are asking the question ‘are you or have you served in the armed forces.
  • Understand prevalence of veterans drinking at harmful (and dependent) levels and their wider health needs (This can be done from working with the alcohol and drug services, and then trying to understands the treatment naive)
  • Ensure the armed forces community receive targeted invitation for the NHS Health Check

5. Making a home in civilian society

Ensuring our armed forces community has a secure place to live

We aim to:

  • Continue to provide homes for veterans in Barnsley, who are experiencing difficulties in assimilating to civilian life.

6. Veterans and the law

Armed forces community has the resilience and awareness to remain law abiding citizens

We aim to:

  • Continue to work with veterans who come into contact with the criminal justice system.

Resources and supporting documents

Support for the Armed Forces community

NHS information for veterans

Local Government Association 2017 Meeting the public health needs of the armed forces 

The South Yorkshire Armed Forces covenant project

NHS England - practises across the country to become veteran friendly



Children in care and care leavers

Why this is important

The role that councils play in looking after children is one of the most important things they do. Local authorities have a unique responsibility to the children they look after and their care leavers.

Read Children's Services Policies, Values and Principles.

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

Find out more about the government statistics.

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Barnsley has developed a Children in Care Pledge which tells children what they can expect from the council and how they will be cared for. 

Find out more about our children in care pledge.

Opportunities for improvement or future development

Information coming soon.

Resources and supporting documentation

Safeguarding families in Barnsley



Children in need

Why this is important

We want to make sure that Barnsley is a safe place for children and young people to grow up.

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

Find out the children in need statistics.

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Barnsley Safeguarding Children Partnership is the organisation responsible for agreeing how services and agencies work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people in the borough and ensuring that they do so effectively. 

Find out more about the Safeguarding Children Partnership.

Find out more about Barnsley Hospital safeguarding children.

Opportunities for improvement or future development

Information coming soon.

Resources and supporting documentation

Further information on the following topics can be found by reading our safeguarding in early years settings site.

  • Safeguarding audit for Early Years settings
  • Breast ironing / breast flattening
  • Honour-based violence against women and girls
  • Prevent duty and the Early Years
  • Prevent and British values
  • County lines, cuckooing and child criminal exploitation
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM)


Child sexual exploitation

Why this is important

Protecting children from harm is one of the most important things councils do, but we can’t stamp out child sexual exploitation without the help of the wider community

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Find out about child sexual exploitation.

Resources and supporting documentation

GOV.UK - tacking child sexual exploitation



Disabilities

Why this is important

People with disabilities and their carers should be able to access the same treatments and care as anyone else.

General demographics:

In Great Britain, there are over 11 million people with a limiting long term illness, impairment or disability.

The most commonly-reported impairments are those that affect mobility, lifting or carrying.

The prevalence of disability rises with age. Around 6% of children are disabled, compared to 16% of working age adults and 45% of adults over State Pension age.

Read more disability facts and figures.

Disability Free Life Expectancy at age 65 years is an important summary measure of health and has implications for: quality of life; fitness for work given increases in the State Pension age; personal finances; social connections and contributions; health and care services; and the wider economy.

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

Read Public Health England's health profiles

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Find out about Barnsley's adult health and social care service.

Resources and supporting documentation




Domestic abuse

Why this is important

Tackling domestic abuse as a public health issue is vital for ensuring that some of the most vulnerable people in our society receive the support, understanding and treatment they deserve. The more we can focus in on interventions that are effective, the more we can treat victims and prevent future re-victimisation. It is also the government's strategic ambition, as set out in Ending Violence against Women and Girls, Strategy 2016 – 2020, to do what it can to contribute to a cohesive and comprehensive response.

Data from:

The Barnsley picture and how we compare

Domestic abuse related incidents and crimes 

What we're doing and the assets or services we have

Read Barnsley Council's domestic abuse and sexual violence web pages for further information about how we are tackling this issue.

Resources and supporting documentation



Early forced marriage

Why this is important

A forced marriage is where one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities or reduced capacity, cannot) consent to the marriage as they are pressurised, or abuse is used, to force them to do so. It is recognised in the UK as a form of domestic or child abuse and a serious abuse of human rights.

Resources and supporting documentation



Gypsies and travellers

Why this is important

Gypsies and travellers may be more susceptible to poor health and less likely to seek health care. Gypsies and travellers should be able to access the same treatments and care as anyone else.

Find out about the count of traveller caravans.

Data from:

GOV.UK - Gypsy and traveller health accommodation and living environment

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

See traveller statistics on GOV.UK

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Find out about Berneslai Homes gypsy and traveller sites 

Find out about gypsy and traveller sites in Barnsley

Resources and supporting documentation

Public Health England - gypsy and traveller sites



LGBT

Why this is important

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans individuals, like anyone, will experience mental health challenges and distress during their lifetime.

However the evidence both from the UK and internationally highlights increased levels of common mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety and stress among people from these groups.

The negative impacts of experiences of discrimination and marginalisation, both direct and indirect, on LGBT individuals and groups are well established.

Research also suggests that there may be additional inequalities affecting LGBT people from ethnic minority communities or those living with disabilities.

Stonewall research into the health of lesbian, gay and bisexual people demonstrates clear health inequalities:

  • Eight per cent of older gay people rate their mental health as ‘poor’ and are more likely to be worried about their mental health than heterosexual older people
  • Single older gay people are more than three times as likely to rate their mental health as ‘poor’ than those in a relationship.

Many older gay people have experienced, or fear, discrimination because of their sexual orientation, which can create a barrier to receiving appropriate care and treatment.

Data from:

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

Find out about the LGBT population in England on GOV.UK

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Barnsley Adult Safeguarding Board recognises that older members of the LGBT community often face particular challenges, because they are:

  • more likely to be single and therefore more likely to require housing or care support to live safely, which might require involvement of a care provider or appointment of a  personal assistant.
  • less likely to have family support and therefore more likely to require care and support services.
  • likely to have experienced discrimination and hostility and therefore are less likely to access the services they need

The Barnsley LGBT forum looks at issues affecting the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community in the borough.

Resources and supporting documentation

Migrants, refugees and asylum seekers

Why is it important 

Certain groups of migrants are particularly vulnerable to potential health needs because of their experiences either before, during or after migration.

Most migrants to the UK come to work or study and are young and healthy. There are however some groups of migrants who may have increased health needs associated with their experiences before, during and after migration.

Groups of vulnerable migrants living in the UK include:

  • asylum seekers and refugees
  • unaccompanied children
  • people who have been trafficked
  • undocumented migrants (those who are living in the UK with no legal status)
  • low paid migrant workers

Find out more at GOV.UK - vulnerable migrants health guide
Find out more at Migration Yorkshire - introduction to migration

The Barnsley Picture and how we compare

Find out more on the Local Migration Profiles (LMP)

What we're doing and the assets and services we have 

Refugee and asylum support
Migration Yorkshire 

Resources and supporting documentation 

Healthwatch Barnsley - women's focus group report March 2019

Healthwatch Barnsley - mens focus group March 2019

Entitlements of migrants to NHS services 

GOV.UK - settled status EU citizens' families 

What is abuse and who abuses



People with learning disabilities

Why this is important

People with learning disabilities and their carers should be able to access the same treatments and care as anyone else.

The Barnsley picture and how do we compare

Find out more in our public health profiles.

What we’re doing and the assets and services we have

Barnsley Hospital is committed to provide people with learning disabilities and their carers with the same access to treatments and care as anyone else.

The Learning Disability Liaison Nurse works across wards including the inpatient, outpatient and emergency departments to ensure that any adult and child with a learning disability receive additional support if required to access hospital services

Resources and supporting documentation